Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Components of the Project Scope Statement

Matt, an experienced project manager, is ready to begin scope definition, but he wants his key project team members to have a common vision for defining the scope of the project. How can he ensure they're all starting on the same page?

As an input, the scope statement must contain certain components to define the scope of the project. Although these components may vary somewhat from project-to-project and from client-to-client, the scope statement must contain at least the following four components.

1. Project justification
The project justification is used during scope definition to help team members understand the business need that the project must meet. Since it is important for the project manager to ensure that the scope of the project meets that need, project justification can be used to provide the basis for evaluating future trade-offs.

2. Product description
The product description is used during scope definition to help team members understand the defining characteristics of the product or service to ensure that the scope will meet the client's expectations.

3. Project deliverables
The project deliverables are used during scope definition to present a summary-level list of the project activities whose delivery marks the completion of the project. Project managers must understand what is involved in each activity so they can break activities down into smaller, more manageable components.

4. Project objectives
The project objectives are used in scope definition to provide quantifiable objectives that must be met for the project to be considered successful. At a minimum, the project should meet cost, schedule, and quality measures.

Never underestimate the importance of scope statements when defining the project scope. If you clearly define the scope up-front, your project will progress as smoothly and as efficiently as possible.

1 comment:

mikie said...

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